A dataset provided by the European Space Agency

Name 088396
Title Understanding state transitions in ULXs: wind spectroscopy of ULX bright states
URL

https://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0883960101
https://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0883960201
https://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0883960301
https://nxsa.esac.esa.int/nxsa-sl/servlet/data-action-aio?obsno=0883960401

DOI https://doi.org/10.57780/esa-phk6akn
Author Dr Ciro Pinto
Description In recent work done with XMM-Newton, we have discovered that ultraluminous X-ray
sources (ULXs) have powerful winds in agreement with theoretical predictions of
super-Eddington accretion. Such winds vary on short timescales and can
temporarily block and reprocess the disc X-ray photons, thus changing the
spectral shape of the source. Enhanced X-ray variability is seen during ULX
highest states including flux dips in soft ULXs and flares in hard ones,
possibly due to a variable wind in our line of sight. We propose to test this,
by studying the hard NGC 4559 X-7 and the soft NGC 55 ULX-1. 130ks XMM-Newton
observation per object triggered during a high state will enable us to perform
time-/flux-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and probe the transition between soft, intermediate, and hard states.
Publication No observations found associated with the current proposal
Instrument EMOS1, EMOS2, EPN, OM, RGS1, RGS2
Temporal Coverage 2021-12-12T05:21:21Z/2022-06-15T07:08:31Z
Version 20.08_20220509_1852
Mission Description The European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) was launched by an Ariane 504 on December 10th 1999. XMM-Newton is ESA's second cornerstone of the Horizon 2000 Science Programme. It carries 3 high throughput X-ray telescopes with an unprecedented effective area, and an optical monitor, the first flown on a X-ray observatory. The large collecting area and ability to make long uninterrupted exposures provide highly sensitive observations.
Since Earth's atmosphere blocks out all X-rays, only a telescope in space can detect and study celestial X-ray sources. The XMM-Newton mission is helping scientists to solve a number of cosmic mysteries, ranging from the enigmatic black holes to the origins of the Universe itself. Observing time on XMM-Newton is being made available to the scientific community, applying for observational periods on a competitive basis.
Creator Contact https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/xmm-newton/xmm-newton-helpdesk
Date Published 2023-07-16T00:00:00Z
Publisher And Registrant European Space Agency
Credit Guidelines European Space Agency, Dr Ciro Pinto, 2023, 088396, 20.08_20220509_1852, European Space Agency, https://doi.org/10.57780/esa-phk6akn